What 'Gilmore Girls' Taught Me (So Far)

Monday, December 7, 2015


My daily end-of-the-night routine lately has been to plant myself on the couch and watch Gilmore Girls. I do this every day, so I'm really not sure what I'm going to do with myself when I finish the series. (Something productive? Ugh.)

I never watched the show when it was on the air, but I am now in the midst of season four. I've watched more than 70 episodes, I think Lorelai is the best, and I wonder just how many jobs Kirk actually has.

What I really admire about the show is the real-life feel of it, with everyday characters living everyday lives. Lorelai doesn't wear a different designer jacket every time she leaves the house; she tends to repeat the same three or four. It's relatable. It's a great show with a lot of solid life lessons woven into every storyline. Here are a few things it's taught me so far:

(*WARNING: SPOILERS*)

Drinking the wrong kind of wine with a meal can make all the difference.
Remember when a customer complained that Sookie's food tasted bad, and she was frazzled and confused until she found out what kind of wine he was drinking and then suddenly it all made sense? This wine with that food? No wonder!

Don't let anything get in the way of friendship.
When Rory started going to Chilton, she and Lane stayed friends. Lorelai and Luke are very different, but are still close friends. Friendship is important, and it doesn't require the two people involved to be completely identical.

You can never have too much coffee.
The most important lesson of them all.

It's good to be independent, but it's okay to ask for help when you need it.
Lorelai has always been very determined to get through life on her own without having to rely on her parents for anything. In order to get Rory into Chilton, though, she had to borrow money from her parents. Her independence and strength is admirable, but asking for help didn't make her any weaker.

Go for what you want, not what you feel obligated to want.
Rory spent her whole life dreaming of attending Harvard, plastering the school all over her walls. When the time came to pick a college, though, she ended up going to Yale, opposite of everyone's expectations. People change their minds.

The plural of "cul-de-sac" is "culs-de-sac."
WHY? This was the ugliest discovery.

Money isn't everything.
Lorelai isn't rich. She's got the wallet of an average jane, but she still has a great life. Having enough money to be able to buy whatever you want whenever you want would be great, sure, but there are certainly scenes with Emily and Richard that make you realize it can also make you somewhat of a snob.

Women can name their kids after themselves too.
Because why not?

Good things can come from bad situations.
Lorelai got pregnant at 16, but considers her daughter the best part of her life. Their Friday night dinners with Lorelai's parents started as dreaded nightmares, but it also brought them closer as a family. Everything has a silver lining.

You should have someone in your life that you can always count on.
Have a Luke, who will help you fix things when you need it so you don't have to spend a lot of money. Have a Rory, who will let you stay the night when you show up at her doorstep and don't want to go home. Have a Sookie, who's always willing to listen and to help you work through your problems. I love all of the friendships in this show. Having someone that you can depend on is important.

Be yourself – and don't apologize for it.
There are plenty of instances where Lorelai is awkward and makes a fool of herself, but she's the best character on the show (in my opinion). She embraces who she is, including acknowledging that getting pregnant at 16 was not the best or smartest thing to happen. Nobody's perfect.


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